Where is the largest obelisk?

Where is the largest obelisk?

Washington Monument

Where did Cleopatra's Needle come from?

Cleopatra's Needle is the obelisk that stands on the Thames Embankment in London. It was transported from Egypt to London in 1877. Cleopatra's Needle is one of three similar Ancient Egyptian obelisks, with the other two re-erected in Paris and New York.

Who made Cleopatra's Needle?

the Dixon brothers

Where location did most people in ancient Egypt live?

Throughout the Dynastic age the population was concentrated in the area around Thebes (modern Luxor: southern Egypt) and in the area around Memphis (today just to the south of modern Cairo).

What did noblemen do in their free time?

The noblemen usually lived in a townhouse in a beautiful neighborhood, and spent their free time sitting in the shade of the garden watching their children play. They only had two jobs, and they were to crush grapes to make wine, and hunt wild fowl.

What did pharaohs do all day?

His day begins with cleaning and dressing by servants including the splendidly named "Chief of the Scented Oils and Pastes for Rubbing His Majesty's Body". When he is clean, he is dressed and adorned with a huge amount of jewelry. After all, he's the pharaoh. He owns vast amounts of gold and he needs to look the part.

What were the noblemen jobs and responsibilities?

The main jobs of noblemen were to either serve the king directly, or to control their peasants to make sure that the money and goods owed to the king were collected. Most famous of the nobleman trades is the knights.

What were the pharaohs jobs and responsibilities?

As 'Lord of the Two Lands' the pharaoh was the ruler of Upper and Lower Egypt. He owned all of the land, made laws, collected taxes, and defended Egypt against foreigners. As 'High Priest of Every Temple', the pharaoh represented the gods on Earth. He performed rituals and built temples to honour the gods.

Where did the Pharaohs come from?

Pharaoh, (from Egyptian per ʿaa, “great house”), originally, the royal palace in ancient Egypt. The word came to be used metonymically for the Egyptian king under the New Kingdom (starting in the 18th dynasty, 1539–1292 bce), and by the 22nd dynasty (c. 945–c. 730 bce) it had been adopted as an epithet of respect.