What is a stick in the mud person?

What is a stick in the mud person?

(idiomatic, derogatory) A person unwilling to participate in activities; a curmudgeon or party pooper. Have a little fun sometimes and don't be such a stick-in-the-mud. (idiomatic, derogatory) More generally, one who is slow, old-fashioned, or unprogressive; an old fogey.

Where did the phrase stick in the mud come from?

Origin of Stick in the Mud This expression originated in the early 1700s. The idea behind is clear, alluding to a vehicle (at the time, a horse drawn carriage) whose wheels were stuck in the mud. Someone who is a stick in the mud doesn't want to try new things.

What does mud mean slang?

bad coffee

What does a stick symbolize?

First used as a weapon, the walking stick or cane has long been a symbol of strength and power, authority and social prestige, predominantly among men. ... The walking stick dates back to ancient times.

Why is money called Lolly?

lolly = money. More popular in the 1960s than today. Precise origin unknown. Possibly rhyming slang linking lollipop to copper.

How much money is a nicker?

Another money slang word, nicker, which means £1, is thought to be connected to the American nickel. Wonga, which describes an unspecified amount of money, may come from the Romany word for coal, wanga.

What is Jack and Danny slang for?

There's also the unfortunate coincidence that 'Jack and Dani' means something a little rude in Cockney rhyming slang – a dialect Danny is very familiar with. “Jack and Dani means something in Cockney rhyming slang….. Fanny. It means fanny.”

Why is a safe called a Peter?

The slang for a safe is a Peter which came from Simon Peter who was known as the rock of Jesus. It may also come from the slang for prison cell which is Peter. Another religious theory about the origin of the phrase Peterman is that a bank robber or safe blower would be robbing Peter to pay Paul.

What does a Toby mean in Cockney slang?

Toby Jug, a pottery jug in the image of a human being, called a "Toby" in Cockney slang. Toby: The Secret Mine, a 2015 video game.

Why is a belly called a derby?

On boiled beef and carrots. "Derby Kell" is old Cockney rhyming slang for belly ("Derby Kelly"). ... It uses the word 'kite' (also 'kyte'), a dialect word, originally derived from an Old English word for the womb which, by extension, came to mean the belly.

What does Filbert mean in Cockney?

nut = head

What does treacle mean in Cockney?

(Cockney rhyming slang) Sweetheart (from treacle tart).

What does a carpet mean in Cockney?

carpet = three pounds (£3) or three hundred pounds (£300), or sometimes thirty pounds (£30). ... The term has since the early 1900s been used by bookmakers and horse-racing, where carpet refers to odds of three-to-one, and in car dealing, where it refers to an amount of £300.

Why is a head called a bonce?

But way back in the 1860s, the biggest marble in the game was called a bonce. And as it's such a good word, it soon made the leap to describe that other gleaming orb, the human head. I assume it started as a form of mockery for bald men, and then softened in meaning, to include everyone.

Why is a piano called a Joanna?

A similar example is "Joanna" meaning "piano", which is based on the pronunciation of "piano" as "pianna" /piˈænə/. Unique formations also exist in other parts of the United Kingdom, such as in the East Midlands, where the local accent has formed "Derby Road", which rhymes with "cold".

What is cockney rhyming slang for toilet?

Khazi is Cockney slang for Toilet.

Why do British call bathroom loo?

Loo. 'Loo' is our very own British word for the toilet, deriving from the French “guardez l'eau”, which means “watch out for the water”. ... When the British adopted it they shortened it to the more pronounceable “gardy-loo”, which eventually became “loo” and was applied to the toilet itself.

What's a fancy word for toilet?

In this page you can discover 63 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for toilet, like: restroom, john, bathroom, latrine, tidy-up, ablutions, pot, loo, commode, shower and ladies-room.

Why is a toilet called a bog?

The bog is a colloquial expression in British English for a toilet. Originally "bog" was used to describe an open cesspit and the word was later applied to the privy connected to it. More wide-spread is the usage bogroll, meaning toilet paper. See also tree bog, not to be confused with the swampland meaning of bog.