How many died in the fire of London?

How many died in the fire of London?

On Sunday, September 2, 1666, London caught on fire. The city burned through Wednesday, and the fire—now known as The Great Fire of London—destroyed the homes of 70,000 out of the 80,000 inhabitants of the city. But for all that fire, the traditional death toll reported is extraordinarily low: just six verified deaths.

What were houses made from in 1666?

What were houses like in 1666? Houses in 1666 where made from wood and straw. The houses were built close together and these materials are highly flammable.

What did they wear in 1666?

In 1666, Charles II of England, Scotland and Ireland, following the earlier example of Louis XIV of France, decreed that at court, men were to wear a long coat, a vest or waistcoat (originally called a petticoat, a term which later became applied solely to women's dress), a cravat, a periwig or wig, and breeches ...

What were dresses called in the 1700s?

mantua

What time period was 1666?

1666 (MDCLXVI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1666th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 666th year of the 2nd millennium, the 66th year of the 17th century, and the 7th year of the 1660s ...

What was happening in 1666?

Miraculously, only 16 people were known to have died. The Great Fire of London was a disaster waiting to happen. London of 1666 was a city of medieval houses made mostly of oak timber. ... So it was on the evening of September 1, 1666, when Thomas Farrinor, the king's baker, failed to properly extinguish his oven.

What jobs did people do 1666?

Tudor Jobs

  • Cordwainer. A cordwainer made shoes out of leather.
  • Weaver. A weaver made cloth by weaving yarn together on a loom. ...
  • Tailor. A tailor made clothes for people who could afford to buy them rather than make their own.
  • Smith. A smith was someone who made things out of metal. ...
  • Mason. ...
  • Barber. ...
  • Servants. ...
  • Merchants.