Whats the definition of illuminate?

Whats the definition of illuminate?

English Language Learners Definition of illuminate : to supply (something) with light : to shine light on (something) : to make (something) clear and easier to understand. See the full definition for illuminate in the English Language Learners Dictionary. illuminate. verb.

What are 3 synonyms for the word illuminate?

illuminate

  • brighten.
  • flash.
  • highlight.
  • spotlight.
  • fire.
  • ignite.
  • illumine.
  • irradiate.

What is a synonym for judge?

Synonyms of judge

  • adjudicator,
  • arbiter,
  • arbitrator,
  • referee,
  • umpire.

Which is the closest synonym for the word dominated?

dominate

  • command.
  • control.
  • dictate.
  • influence.
  • lead.
  • manage.
  • overshadow.
  • run.

What is a dominant person?

Dominant personality types are goal-oriented, decisive, and competitive. They care more about results than personal relationships. ... People with dominant personality types are also relatively impatient and controlling. They want information — fast — so they can make a decision and move on.

What is dominant science?

Refers to a trait that appears more frequently than another trait, resulting from interactions between gene alleles.

What's a recessive trait?

A recessive trait is the weak, unexpressed trait of a dichotomous pair of alleles (dominant-recessive) that has no effect in the phenotype of heterozygous individuals.

What does heredity mean?

Heredity, the sum of all biological processes by which particular characteristics are transmitted from parents to their offspring. ... Both aspects of heredity can be explained by genes, the functional units of heritable material that are found within all living cells.

What is the example of dominance?

Dominance, in genetics, greater influence by one of a pair of genes (alleles) that affect the same inherited character. If an individual pea plant with the alleles T and t (T = tallness, t = shortness) is the same height as a TT individual, the T allele (and the trait of tallness) is said to be completely dominant.

What is a complete dominance?

In complete dominance, only one allele in the genotype is seen in the phenotype. In codominance, both alleles in the genotype are seen in the phenotype. In incomplete dominance, a mixture of the alleles in the genotype is seen in the phenotype. Created by Ross Firestone.

What phenotype means?

The term "phenotype" refers to the observable physical properties of an organism; these include the organism's appearance, development, and behavior. ... Phenotypes also include observable characteristics that can be measured in the laboratory, such as levels of hormones or blood cells.

How is dominance determined?

In genetics, dominance is the phenomenon of one variant (allele) of a gene on a chromosome masking or overriding the effect of a different variant of the same gene on the other copy of the chromosome. The first variant is termed dominant and the second recessive.

Is tallness a dominant trait in humans?

For most individuals, though, height is controlled largely by a combination of genetic variants that each have more modest effects on height, plus a smaller contribution from environmental factors (such as nutrition). More than 700 such gene variants have been discovered and many more are expected to be identified.

Are blue eyes recessive?

Eye color is not an example of a simple genetic trait, and blue eyes are not determined by a recessive allele at one gene. Instead, eye color is determined by variation at several different genes and the interactions between them, and this makes it possible for two blue-eyed parents to have brown-eyed children.

Is BB dominant or recessive?

An organism with one dominant allele and one recessive allele is said to have a heterozygous genotype. In our example, this genotype is written Bb. Finally, the genotype of an organism with two recessive alleles is called homozygous recessive. In the eye color example, this genotype is written bb.

How do you know if its dominant or recessive?

If both parents do not have the trait and the child does, it is recessive. If one parent has the trait and the child does or does not, it is dominant.

What are the 3 genotypes?

Genotype is also used to refer to the pair of alleles present at a single locus. With alleles 'A' and 'a' there are three possible genotypes AA, Aa and aa.

How do alleles work?

An allele is one of two or more versions of a gene. An individual inherits two alleles for each gene, one from each parent. If the two alleles are the same, the individual is homozygous for that gene. If the alleles are different, the individual is heterozygous.

What are some examples of alleles?

Gene vs allele: chart
GeneAllele
DeterminesAn organism's genotypeAn organism's phenotype
Number per genus locusOneTwo
Various TypesAllelesPaternal vs maternal Dominant vs recessive
ExamplesEye color, hair color, skin pigmentationBlue eyes, brown hair, dark skin

What do alleles do?

Alleles contribute to the organism's phenotype, which is the outward appearance of the organism. Some alleles are dominant or recessive. When an organism is heterozygous at a specific locus and carries one dominant and one recessive allele, the organism will express the dominant phenotype.

How alleles are formed?

When SNPs and other mutations create variants or alternate types of a particular gene, the alternative gene forms are referred to as alleles . ... In other words, a given gene can have multiple alleles (i.e., alternate forms). Some genes have just a few alleles, but others have many.

Why are alleles important?

Alleles play a big role in determining our inherited traits, along with DNA and genes. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the hereditary material that humans and other living organisms get from each parent.

Where do alleles come from?

One allele for every gene in an organism is inherited from each of that organism's parents. In some cases, both parents provide the same allele of a given gene, and the offspring is referred to as homozygous ("homo" meaning "same") for that allele.

What are risk alleles?

The term “risk allele” refers to variant(s) with very low penetrance such that their effects are incomplete and do not manifest in a Mendelian pattern of inheritance.

Are SNPs alleles?

A single nucleotide polymorphism, or SNP (pronounced "snip"), is a variation at a single position in a DNA sequence among individuals. If a SNP occurs within a gene, then the gene is described as having more than one allele. ... In these cases, SNPs may lead to variations in the amino acid sequence.

What is effect size in GWAS?

Typical GWAS odds ratios are about 1.

What is an alternative allele?

In contrast, the alternative allele refers to any base, other than the reference, that is found at that locus. The alternative allele is not necessarily the minor allele and it may, or may not, be linked to a phenotype. There can be more than one alternative allele per variant.

How do you identify a haplotype?

As before, the most common haplotype form is first identified, and the similarity score between this haplotype form and each of the N chromosomes is calculated. The similarity score between two haplotypes is calculated as the proportion of SNPs where the alleles are identical across the two haplotypes.