What does Jook mean in slang?

What does Jook mean in slang?

jook in British English (dʒʊk ) or Caribbean informal chook. verb. 1. ( transitive) to poke or puncture (the skin)

What does whoopty mean in slang?

Whoopty is short for marijuana also slang for cool&good. ... Whoopty is not slang for a bad car, that is hooptie.

What does Cripted mean?

adjective. Formed like a crypt, vaulted; provided with a crypt.

What is cryptic message?

Cryptic comments or messages are hard to understand because they seem to have a hidden meaning. Cryptic is from Late Latin crypticus, from Greek kryptos, "hidden." This Greek adjective is the source of the English noun crypt, referring to a room under a church in which dead people are buried.

What does plague mean?

transitive verb. 1 : to smite, infest, or afflict with or as if with disease, calamity, or natural evil. 2a : to cause worry or distress to : hamper, burden. b : to disturb or annoy persistently.

What's the difference between a pestilence and a plague?

As nouns the difference between pestilence and plague is that pestilence is any epidemic disease that is highly contagious, infectious, virulent and devastating while plague is the bubonic plague, the pestilent disease caused by the virulent bacterium ''yersinia pestis .

Is a plague a virus or bacteria?

Plague is an infectious disease that affects animals and humans. It is caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. This bacterium is found in rodents and their fleas and occurs in many areas of the world, including the United States.

What is the biblical definition of a plague?

It can mean slaughter, a disease, a strong blow or a death blow. Another Hebrew term is debher, which more explicitly means a disease, and in the Hebrew Scriptures this is normally associated with divine anger. ... These words are often tied to the wrath of God, which inflicts the plagues.

What was the fourth plague?

The fourth plague of Egypt was of creatures capable of harming people and livestock. The Torah emphasizes that the 'arob (עָרוֹב "mixture" or "swarm") only came against the Egyptians and did not affect the Israelites. Pharaoh asked Moses to remove this plague and promised to grant the Israelites their freedom.

When was the last major plague?

The first two major plague pandemics began with the Plague of Justinian and the Black Death. The most recent, the so-called “Third Pandemic,” erupted in 1855 in the Chinese province of Yunnan.

What is the number 1 killer in the world?

The world's biggest killer is ischaemic heart disease, responsible for 16% of the world's total deaths. Since 2000, the largest increase in deaths has been for this disease, rising by more than 2 million to 8.

Is the Spanish flu still around?

Descendants of the 1918 H1N1 virus make up the influenza viruses we're fighting today. “The 1918 flu is still with us, in that sense,” said Ann Reid, the executive director of the National Center for Science Education who successfully sequenced the genetic makeup of the 1918 influenza virus in the 1990s.

How long did the 1918 flu last?

The influenza pandemic of 1918–19, also called the Spanish flu, lasted between one and two years. The pandemic occurred in three waves, though not simultaneously around the globe.

Where did 1918 flu start?

Some medical historians and epidemiologists have theorized that the 1918 pandemic began in Asia, citing a lethal outbreak of pulmonary disease in China as the forerunner of the pandemic. Others have speculated the virus was spread by Chinese or Vietnamese laborers either crossing the United States or working in France.

What were the symptoms of the 1918 flu?

Symptoms: Normal flu symptoms of fever, nausea, aches and diarrhea. Many developed severe pneumonia attack. Dark spots would appear on the cheeks and patients would turn blue, suffocating from a lack of oxygen as lungs filled with a frothy, bloody substance.

Why did the 1918 flu spread so quickly?

Historians now believe that the fatal severity of the Spanish flu's “second wave” was caused by a mutated virus spread by wartime troop movements. When the Spanish flu first appeared in early March 1918, it had all the hallmarks of a seasonal flu, albeit a highly contagious and virulent strain.